How to Build a Targeted Brand – Smart Passive Income

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    In the old way, companies relied on traditional advertising to bring products to an audience of passive consumers.

    Nowadays the boundaries are blurring and the communication channels are diverse. Focus groups are not convened anywhere in a laboratory; They give you live, real-time feedback on every step of your journey. In the visionary Cluetrain Manifesto from 1999, the authors offered an invitation and a warning:

    Connected markets are starting to organize themselves faster than the companies that have traditionally served them. Thanks to the Internet, markets are becoming better informed, smarter and demanding more qualities that most business organizations lack.

    —Cluetrain Manifesto

    When you learn to embrace this shift target group oriented Brands and companies can become a superpower driving their growth.

    When your customers or subscribers are more than just passive consumers of your ads and products, they become incredibly powerful potential supporters, evangelists, and advisors.

    Building your business is a lot easier when you do it together with the people you want to serve!

    What to expect in this article:

    How do I involve my audience?

    1. Determine your higher purpose.

    2. Build in public.

    3. Ask for help.

    What to look out for

    1. Distraction

    2. Overpower

    3. Too many different directions to go

    The summit for building an audience-centric brand

    How do I involve my audience?

    The nice thing about being audience-centric is that it’s eclectic and iterative. You can start practicing before you even know what type of project you want to create!

    The whole idea is to open up your efforts to include others. Not sure what to do next? Say it in a room where others can offer their guidance. Are you trying to choose between the colors for your company t-shirt? Question your people!

    This can be a radical change in mindset for people who are used to showing off only the brightest and most polished side of their business. Indeed, there is some risk in exposing the unfinished and imperfect side of your job, but the benefits can far outweigh that risk.

    1. Determine your higher purpose.

    You and your audience are united in a common interest. The better you know what that common interest is, the more similarities you can build.

    Whatever products and services you offer address an unmet need. The circumstances that drive this need are often major trends or social injustices that you can really get into conversation about. This gives you a powerful foundation on which to build a company that can adapt to the changing times.

    This also gives you a clear way of engaging authentically with your audience in a way that isn’t always about getting them to buy your stuff. This will help you build trust which will help you build your business.

    Take Chris Herd, for example. His company helps other companies manage their remote workers. While he occasionally takes the time to discuss his company’s offerings, much of his public correspondence has been focused on his deep passion for assisting remote work:

    People whose values ​​match his will inevitably find him and appreciate his contributions to the discussion. Some of these people become his customers. Even if he changes his business model or his offerings, he still has that reputation in the community because he has a higher purpose that he can return to again and again!

    2. Build in public.

    The term “public building” has grown in popularity in recent years as people started using Twitter threads and other forms of media to invite people behind the scenes.

    Ask yourself: How can I share more of my work in progress? Can I record a time-lapse video of myself designing something new in real time, or even stream it live while creating something? If I get stuck, can I ask the question out loud so others can answer instead of just asking myself? If I have won, how can I celebrate it for others to see?

    When people can see the work under the covers, they are all the more excited to see the finished product – and tell their friends about it!

    3. Ask for help.

    I once built a coworking space. I didn’t have a business in setting up a coworking space – I was young, had no money and no experience in business, let alone in brick-and-mortar business. But I had a deep passion for creating a space to bring people together who would otherwise be stuck home alone, and that passion combined with the desires of others around me.

    So when I had to do something I couldn’t do myself, I reached out to my community. In the process of developing my space, I got legal help, design help, web development help, IT help, free hardware, and much more. Everyone was happy to support me because the success of my project was important to them.

    When you have a clear purpose that resonates with others, they want to help you make your shared vision a reality. The more you involve people in this process, the more emotionally they will feel invested in what you are doing, which will only add to your support base!

    What to look out for

    The audience-facing route is a powerful one that I recommend to anyone, but it comes with its own set of challenges and tradeoffs. Here are some pitfalls to watch out for:

    1. Distraction

    Are you too busy telling the story instead of doing the work? Sometimes the process of sharing about what you do and engaging with people eats up your time and prevents you from actually getting the job done.

    2. Overpower

    So much correspondence! The more you present yourself out there, the more people will see you … and answer you … and ask you questions … and want your attention. That’s the point, of course, but it also means you need to be careful about your limits. If you find yourself being flooded, take a step back and think about how to reconfigure your communications so that you can manage the flow.

    3. Too many different directions to go

    “Hey, you should do this!” – a lot of people will have lots of ideas about how you should spend your precious time. It helps to set clear boundaries for dealing with new ideas.

    I’ve found it helpful to set specific times each month or quarter to come up with new ideas. You can take into account any new ideas from your backlog and determine what you will be working on in the future. Any new ideas that come in can be added to your backlog by the next review day!

    The free resource for building a target group-oriented brand

    Building an audience-centric business will help you build an engaged, passionate following. It helps you build social capital and stay authentic. While it might feel a little weird to practice at first, over time it becomes difficult to think of another way to build your business.

    Would you like to learn more about how to build a target-oriented business? Take part for our own Audience Driven Summit, 12.-13. October 2021. We’ve put together a number of notable speakers to teach you their best techniques – and it’s completely free. See who is speaking and register now:

    Learn about the best ways to build your audience in 2021 on AudienceDriven.co.



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